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Asian Art Calendar of Events

Thursday, February 29, 2024
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    New Mandala Lab
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Oct 01, 2021 to Oct 30, 2027
    Detail: An Interactive Space for Social, Emotional, and Ethical Learning

    The Mandala Lab, located on the Museum’s remodeled third floor, invites curiosity about our emotions. Consider how complex feelings show up in your everyday life and imagine how you might have the power to transform them.

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    New Samurai Splendor: Sword Fittings from Edo Japan
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Mar 21, 2022 to Mar 31, 2024
    Detail: After almost a century and a half of near-constant civil war and political upheaval, Japan unified under a new ruling family, the Tokugawa, in the early 1600s. Their reign lasted for more than 250 years, in an era referred to as the Edo period, after the town of Edo (present-day Tokyo) that became the new capital of Japan. The Tokugawa regime brought economic growth, prolonged peace, and widespread enjoyment of the arts and culture. The administration also imposed strict class separation and rigid regulations for all. As a result, the ruling class—with the shogun as governing military official, the daimyo as local feudal lords, and the samurai as their retainers—had only a few ways to display personal taste in public. Fittings and accessories for their swords, which were an indispensable symbol of power and authority, became a critical means of self-expression and a focal point of artistic creation.

    This installation explores the luxurious aspects of Edo-period sword fashion, a fascinating form of arms and armor rarely featured in exhibitions outside Japan. It presents a selection of exquisite sword mountings, fittings, and related objects, including maker’s sketchbooks—all drawn from The Met collection and many rarely or never exhibited before.

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    New Gateway to Himalayan Art
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Jun 11, 2022 to Aug 03, 2025
    Detail: Gateway to Himalayan Art introduces you to the main forms, concepts, meanings, and traditions of Himalayan art represented in the Rubin Museum collection.

    The exhibition opens with a large map that highlights regions of the diverse Himalayan cultural sphere, including parts of present-day India, China, Nepal, Bhutan, and Mongolia. Gateway invites you to explore exemplary objects from the Museum’s collection, organized and presented in thematic sections: Figures and Symbols, Materials and Techniques, and Purpose and Function.

    In addition to sculptures and paintings, objects such as a stupa, prayer wheel, and ritual implements demonstrate how patrons sought the accumulation of merit and hoped for wealth, long life, and spiritual gains, all to be fulfilled through the ritual use of these objects and commissioning works of art.

    Among the featured installations are a display that explains the process of Nepalese lost-wax metal casting and a presentation of the stages of Tibetan hanging scroll painting (thangka). You will also encounter life-size reproductions of murals from Tibet’s Lukhang Temple, photographed by Thomas Laird and Clint Clemens.

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    New A Passion for Jade: The Bishop Collection
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Jul 02, 2022 to Feb 17, 2025
    Detail: More than a hundred remarkable objects from the Heber Bishop collection, including carvings of jade, the most esteemed stone in China, and many other hardstones, are on view in this focused presentation. The refined works represent the sophisticated art of Chinese gemstone carvers during the Qing dynasty (1644–1911) as well as the highly accomplished skills of Mogul Indian (1526–1857) craftsmen, which provided an exotic inspiration to their Chinese counterparts. Also on view are a set of Chinese stone-working tools and illustrations of jade workshops, which will introduce the traditional method of working jade.

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    New Embracing Color: Enamel in Chinese Decorative Arts, 1300–1900
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Jul 02, 2022 to Jan 04, 2026
    Detail: Enamel decoration is a significant element of Chinese decorative arts that has long been overlooked. This exhibition reveals the aesthetic, technical, and cultural achievement of Chinese enamel wares by demonstrating the transformative role of enamel during the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing (1644–1911) dynasties. The first transformational moment occurred in the late 14th to 15th century, when the introduction of cloisonné enamel from the West, along with the development of porcelain with overglaze enamels, led to a shift away from a monochromatic palette to colorful works. The second transformation occurred in the late 17th to 18th century, when European enameling materials and techniques were brought to the Qing court and more subtle and varied color tones were developed on enamels applied over porcelain, metal, glass, and other mediums. In both moments, Chinese artists did not simply adopt or copy foreign techniques; they actively created new colors and styles that reflected their own taste. The more than 100 objects on view are drawn mainly from The Met collection.

    Rotation 1: July 2, 2022–April 30, 2023
    Rotation 2: May 20, 2023–March 24, 2024
    Rotation 3: April 13, 2024–Feb 17, 2025

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    New Ganesha: Lord of New Beginnings
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Nov 19, 2022 to Jun 16, 2024
    Detail: Ganesha, the son of Shiva and Parvati, is a Brahmanical (Hindu) diety known to clear a path to the gods and remove obstacles in everyday life. He is loved by his devotees (bhakti) for his many traits, including his insatiable appetite for sweet cakes and his role as a dispenser of magic, surprise, and laughter. However, Ganesha is also the lord of ganas (nature deities) and can take on a fearsome aspect in this guise.

    The seventh- to twenty-first-century works in this exhibition trace his depiction across the Indian subcontinent, the Himalayas, and Southeast Asia. Featuring 24 works across sculptures, paintings, musical instruments, ritual implements, and photography, the exhibition emphasizes the vitality and exuberance of Ganesha as the bringer of new beginnings.

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    New Anyang: China’s Ancient City of Kings
    Place: Smithsonian Institution - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave. SW, USA
    Date: Feb 25, 2023 to Apr 28, 2024
    Detail: Anyang: China’s Ancient City of Kings is the first major exhibition in the United States dedicated to Anyang, the capital of China’s Shang dynasty (occupied ca. 1250 BCE–ca. 1050 BCE). The source of China’s earliest surviving written records and the birthplace of Chinese archaeology, Anyang holds a special connection with the National Museum of Asian Art. In 1929, one year after Academia Sinica began archaeological work at the Bronze Age site, Li Chi assumed leadership of the excavations. At the time, he was also a staff member of the Freer Gallery of Art (1925–30). To promote archaeological practice in China, the Freer supported Li Chi and his first two seasons of work at Anyang. This collaboration, predicated on the advancement of scientific knowledge and the protection of cultural patrimony, marks an important chapter in the history of Sino-American relations.

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    New Anxiety and Hope in Japanese Art
    Place: The Met Fifth Avenue - New York, 1000 Fifth Avenue, USA
    Date: Apr 08, 2023 to Jul 14, 2024
    Detail: Drawn largely from The Met’s renowned collection of Japanese art, this exhibition explores the twin themes of anxiety and hope, with a focus on the human stories in and around art and art making.

    The exhibition begins with sacred images from early Japan that speak to concerns about death, dying, and the afterlife or that were created in response to other uncertainties, such as war and natural disaster. The presentation then proceeds chronologically, highlighting medieval Buddhist images of paradises and hells, Zen responses to life and death, depictions of war and pilgrimage, and the role of protective and hopeful images in everyday life. In the final galleries, the exhibition’s underlying themes are explored through a selection of modern woodblock prints, garments, and photographs.

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    New Art Lab: Spirits of Time: Netsuke from the Joseph and Elena Kurstin Collection
    Place: Lowe Art Museum - Coral Gables, 1301 Stanford Drive, Florida, USA
    Date: Apr 25, 2023 to Mar 03, 2024
    Detail: This year's ArtLab will highlight miniature masterpieces carved from a variety of media and spanning several centuries. This student-curated exhibition will complement works on view in the Lowe's Taplin Gallery for Asian Art as well as Transcendent Clay: Kondo/A Century of Japanese Ceramic Art, opening March 23, 2023. ArtLab students will also spend a week in mid-March in Kyoto, Japan, where they will engage in transnational, transcultural exchange with University of Kyoto students as well as visiting local artists and artisans, museums, and historic sites in person. Through this program, the Lowe truly touches lives and transforms the University of Miami student experience!

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    New Jakhodo Today
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin Street, California, USA
    Date: Aug 24, 2023 to Aug 24, 2024
    Detail: Jakhodo Today by Dave Young Kim (American, b. 1979) was commissioned by the Asian Art Museum for the Lawrence and Gorretti Lui Hyde Street Art Wall and installed in 2023. Kim’s composition draws inspiration from Korean folk paintings of the Joseon dynasty (1392–1910). The tiger and magpie pairing appears so frequently in Korean art that it comprises its own genre: jakhodo, paintings depicting tigers and magpies. As tigers were believed to expel evil spirits and magpies represented bearers of good news, paintings of this duo were sometimes placed on the front gates or doors of houses to bring good luck. In time, a political dimension also emerged: caricatured as a foolish oaf, the tiger became a symbol for the aristocratic yangban, while the dignified magpie represented the common people; the display of such imagery allowed villagers to quietly rebel against the ruling class. The mural’s saekdong (colorful stripes) are a decorative element often used to adorn clothes and traditionally thought to summon good fortune. Their five or seven colored stripes originated with the concept of eumyang-ohaeng, or yin and yang, and the five elements.

    The tiger and magpie appear on several artworks in the museum’s collection of Korean art. Kim notes that many Korean Americans may have grown up with such imagery without being privy to the symbolism behind it. “It speaks of the familiarity of gleaned tradition without having knowledge of the deeper context or ancestral culture,” says Kim; “this is the immigrant story.”

    Dave Young Kim is a Los Angeles-based artist with Bay Area roots. A co-founder of the Korean American Artist Collective, Kim often uses the specific to address universal ideas of the human condition in his artwork. Fundamentally, he explains, his work speaks to the premise that “we are all looking for a place to call home.”

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    New Pearls from the Ocean of Contentment
    Place: San Diego Museum of Art - San Diego, 1450 El Prado, Balboa Park, USA
    Date: Oct 07, 2023 to Apr 07, 2024
    Detail: Featuring arts of the book from South Asia and the Persianate world, produced from the 12th through the 19th centuries, Pearls from the Ocean of Contentment explores new ways of presenting the Museum’s world-renowned Edwin Binney 3rd Collection of paintings, drawings, calligraphies, and manuscripts from South Asia, Iran, and Central Asia by focusing on the regional contours and geographies of India and surrounding areas.

    Many of the featured works were once bound in elaborately illustrated manuscripts, some surviving in complete form. Others were assembled in albums as personalized collections of painting, drawing, and calligraphy. Made primarily in royal workshops, they have typically been categorized by court or dynasty and the regions in which they flourished. Most of the works were eventually acquired by Edwin Binney 3rd (1925–1986), a Harvard-educated heir to the Crayola fortune with a wide-ranging interest in the arts, who then bequeathed his collection to the Museum. Intended to be encyclopedic in scope, the Museum’s Binney collection of over 1,400 works surveys every major school of painting across seven centuries. This rotating display explores the collection and its diversity through the regional contours and geographies of India and surrounding areas.

    Unfortunately, as manuscripts moved onto the art market, they were often disassembled and sold as individual folios of painting and calligraphy, destroying the original context for the images. While Binney’s position of privilege allowed him abundant access to and participation in this market, the collection’s size, range, and bequest reflect an ultimate desire for it to be preserved and shared with the public. Today, these works engage and delight audiences through their subject matter, narratives, and themes, providing insight about artists, workshops, and the production of painting and books in these regions.

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    New Deities, Paragons, and Legends: Storytelling in Chinese Pictorial Arts
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin Street, California, USA
    Date: Oct 13, 2023 to Jul 08, 2024
    Detail: This selection of paintings, textiles, and lacquerware illustrates well-known historical stories and love romances, tales of popular deities and heroic figures, and anecdotes of filial sons and celebrated scholars in Chinese art. For centuries, these fascinating images and their inscriptions were used to inform, entertain, and instruct various audiences, whether for religious persuasion, social engagement, cultural statement, or moral teaching. A showcase of these narrative or figural images in various mediums illuminates the deeply rooted visual cultural tradition that has existed in Chinese society across dynasties.

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    New Korea in Color: A Legacy of Auspicious Images
    Place: San Diego Museum of Art - San Diego, 1450 El Prado, Balboa Park, USA
    Date: Oct 28, 2023 to Mar 03, 2024
    Detail: The special exhibition Korea in Color: A Legacy of Auspicious Images sheds light on the use of color in Korean painting—known as polychrome painting (chaesaekhwa)—and its role in Korean art and culture. Polychrome painting flourished during the Joseon Dynasty (1392–1910) and the colorful artworks created during this era, featuring symbolic images from sacred to secular, permeated all sectors of society. Highlighting contemporary works of art in dialogue with select masterpieces from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the fifty works presented throughout these galleries highlight the continued influence of color and the legacy of auspicious images, long overshadowed by painting created in black ink, and span a variety of media, including painting, sculpture, prints, video, and multi-media installations.

    Korea in Color invites visitors to encounter the role art once played in everyday Korean life across four themes connected to a traditional household: protection offered by animals at the doorstep; symbols of abundance and longevity in the garden; scholarly objects and books in the study; and the appreciation of majestic mountains beyond the walls of the home. These four sections are organized around core elements of traditional Korean painting: Byeoksa, protection against evil spirits; Gilsang, good fortune; Gyohun, edification; and Gamsang, appreciation, and prompt consideration of how these qualities intersect with life today.

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    New Japanese Tastes in Chinese Ceramics
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin Street, USA
    Date: Nov 17, 2023 to May 06, 2024
    Detail: Exquisite Chinese and Chinese-influenced ceramics from the Kyoto National Museum demonstrate the importance of Chinese art to Japanese tea culture.

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    New Ruth Asawa: Untitled (S.272)
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin Street, California, USA
    Date: Nov 17, 2023 to Feb 24, 2025
    Detail: A chance to intimately encounter one of Ruth Asawa’s most celebrated works.

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    New Knotted Clay: Raku Ceramics and Tea
    Place: Smithsonian Institution - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave. SW, USA
    Date: Dec 09, 2023 to Dec 09, 2026
    Detail: Japan’s rich history of ceramic artistry developed in large part alongside the culture of drinking tea. The practice of preparing and serving matcha, powdered green tea, was called chanoyu (literally, “hot water for tea”) and gained popularity in the sixteenth century. Japanese tea practitioners initially used Chinese and Korean antique ceramics as tea bowls but began using newly made Japanese tea bowls, such as Raku ware, in the sixteenth century. Raku ware shares its name with the family that has made these ceramics in Kyoto since the sixteenth century. Unlike most tea bowls, Raku ceramics are built by hand—a process described as “knotting clay”—as opposed to using a wheel. Sixteenth-century potters are said to have collaborated closely with their tea-practitioner patrons to create distinctive vessels best-suited for tea drinking.

    Over the next four centuries, a network of Japanese potters incorporated Raku techniques into their practice; these techniques were later adopted in the 1950s by the American studio pottery movement. Raku wares are now internationally recognized as a Japanese ceramic style and continue to inspire artistic creativity worldwide. Knotted Clay: Raku Ceramics and Tea explores these distinctive, hand-molded ceramics and their close relationship to Japanese tea culture. This exhibition features tea bowls, water containers, and other vessels in the museum’s permanent collection that demonstrate the glazes and forms unique to Raku ware.

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    New Dining with the Sultan: The Fine Art of Feasting
    Place: Los Angeles County Museum of Art - Los Angeles, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., California, USA
    Date: Dec 17, 2023 to Aug 04, 2024
    Detail: The act of coming together to partake of a meal is a practice shared by all cultures. Food defines us—we are what we eat. Dining with the Sultan is the first exhibition to present Islamic art in the context of its associated culinary traditions. It will include some 250 works of art related to the sourcing, preparation, serving, and consumption of food, from 30 public and private collections in the U.S., Europe, and the Middle East—objects of undisputed quality and appeal, viewed through the universal lens of fine dining. The exhibition will stimulate not only the eyes but also the appetite, reminding visitors of the communal pleasure of food—both its taste and its presentation. It will provide much-needed information on the enormous class of luxury objects that may be broadly defined as tableware and demonstrate how gustatory discernment was a fundamental activity at the great Islamic courts.

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    New Japanese Ink Paintings
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin Street, California, USA
    Date: Dec 21, 2023 to May 06, 2024
    Detail: Highlights from the collection illustrate how Japanese artists from the 15th to the early 17th century engaged with Chinese ink painting styles.

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    New Into View: New Voices, New Stories
    Place: Asian Art Museum - San Francisco, 200 Larkin Street, California, USA
    Date: Jan 19, 2024 to Oct 17, 2024
    Detail: Recently acquired work by fourteen contemporary artists whose alternative narratives of mythology, history, and identity speak to a radically reimagined future.

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    New By the Light of the Moon: Nighttime in Japanese Prints
    Place: Art Institute Chicago - Chicago, 111 South Michigan Avenue, USA
    Date: Jan 20, 2024 to Apr 14, 2024
    Detail: Whether as a darkened backdrop for action-packed figural scenes or as a dominant presence over unpeopled landscapes, Japanese printmakers have represented nighttime in various ways over the past several centuries.

    In the earliest prints shown in this exhibition opening this Saturday, figures are the main focus of each image and darkness simply sets the stage. This is true for the mid- to late 18th-century works of Okumura Masanobu and Suzuki Harunobu, where a solid curtain of black appears behind each dramatic scene. By the 19th century, however, landscape prints were often dominated by the night sky—with or without a moon—and townspeople in urban settings or travelers in rural scenes were less prominent.

    Over time, some artists became more adventurous and began to depict different seasons and moments during the day. In the prints by Utagawa Hiroshige featured here, he has set each scene at a specific phase of the night, such as twilight or midnight, indicated by the hues of the sky. By the 20th century, artists could express the various moods associated with nighttime by the way they represented how shadows were cast, the brightness of stars, the reflections of the moon on vast oceans or small puddles, and the isolation of lonely travelers. In particular, Kawase Hasui cleverly incorporated small amounts of light into otherwise dark scenes to produce some of the most haunting images in the history of Japanese prints.

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    New Jian Yoo Iridescent Hue
    Place: The Korea Society - New York, 350 Madison Avenue, 24th Floor, USA
    Date: Jan 25, 2024 to Apr 18, 2024
    Detail: Working in the precise and fine medium of mother of pearl — jagae in Korean – Jian Yoo’s iridescent art bridges historical and contemporary, nature and artificial, arts and crafts. Made of thousands of mother-of-pearl pieces layered in intricate patterns, Yoo’s art respectfully acknowledges the long tradition of master craft workers while reinventing the genre with distinctively modern sensibilities.

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    New Korean Treasures from the Chester and Cameron Chang Collection
    Place: Los Angeles County Museum of Art - Los Angeles, 5905 Wilshire Blvd., USA
    Date: Feb 25, 2024 to Jun 30, 2024
    Detail: Korean Treasures presents 35 artworks recently donated to LACMA by Drs. Chester and Cameron C. Chang (M.D.), selected from the largest gift of Korean art in the museum’s history. Chester Chang (Chang Jung Ki) was born in Seoul in 1939 and first moved to the United States as a child with his family in 1949, when his father, Chang Chi Whan, was appointed General Secretary to the first Consul General of Korea in Los Angeles. The bulk of the Chang family collection has been intact for over a century. This introductory exhibition presents traditional Korean paintings, calligraphic folding screens, mid-20th century oil paintings from both North and South Korea, and ceramics of the Goryeo (918–1392) and Joseon (1392–1897) dynasties.

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    New Reimagine: Himalayan Art Now
    Place: The Rubin Museum of Art - New York, 150 West 17th St., USA
    Date: Mar 15, 2024 to Oct 06, 2024
    Detail: Contemplate and celebrate what Himalayan art means now with a Museum-wide exhibition of artworks by over 30 contemporary artists, many from the Himalayan region and diaspora and others inspired by Himalayan art and cultures.

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    New Staging the Supernatural: Ghosts and the Theater in Japanese Prints
    Place: Smithsonian Institution - Washington, 1050 Independence Ave. SW, USA
    Date: Mar 23, 2024 to Oct 06, 2024
    Detail: Throughout Japanese cultural history, the boundary between the real world and the world of supernatural beings has been remarkably porous. Certain sites, states of mind, or periods in the lunar cycle made humans particularly vulnerable to ghostly intervention. The Edo period (1603–1868) was a crucial stage in the development and solidification of ideas about the supernatural. Many of the beliefs that gained currency at this time are still held as conventional wisdom in Japan today.

    Supernatural entities came to life especially during noh and kabuki theater performances. Explore—if you dare—the roles that ghosts and spirits play in the retelling of Japanese legends and real events. Staging the Supernatural brings together a collection of vibrant, colorful woodblock prints and illustrated books depicting the specters that haunt these two theatrical traditions.

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    Europe & Africa USA & Canada | Asia

    New Beguiling Beni: Safflower Red in Japanese Fashion
    Place: The Victoria & Albert Museum - London, Cromwell Rd, United Kingdom
    Date: Jun 02, 2022 to Mar 31, 2024
    Detail: The Japanese dye 'beni', made from safflower petals, produces red hues and an iridescent green. This display reveals its many uses in fashion, from heel-less shoes by Noritaka Tatehana, to textiles, cosmetics and ukiyo-e woodblock prints.

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    Asia USA & Canada | Europe & Africa

    New Textile Masters to the World: The global desire for Indian cloth
    Place: Asian Civilisations Museum - Singapore, 1 Empress Pl, Singapore 179555, Singapore
    Date: Mar 24, 2023 to Jan 24, 2025
    Detail: From 24 March 2023
    Daily, 10am - 7pm | Fridays, 10am - 9pm
    Asian Civilisations Museum, Level 3, Fashion and Textiles Gallery

    The Asian Civilisations Museum presents Textile Masters to the World: The global desire for Indian cloth with a selection of exquisite garments and textiles at its Fashion and Textiles Gallery. Featuring 27 pieces from the National Collection and loans, the exhibition spotlights the historic global impact of textile production in India, and its role as evidence of trade and cultural exchange between India and regions such as the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and Europe from the fourteenth to nineteenth century. From fashion and furnishing, to gift exchange and heirlooms, visitors can marvel at the artistry and craftsmanship of early textile masters, and discover how Indian textiles influenced local designs, materials and fashions wherever they were traded.

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    New Ike Taiga―Landscape of Sunlight
    Place: Idemitsu Museum of Arts - Tokyo, 9th Floor, Teigeki Bldg., 3-1-1,Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Japan
    Date: Feb 10, 2024 to Mar 24, 2024
    Detail: Landscape paintings depict the rustling of trees and leaves and the shimmering surface of water using only ink and color dots. These landscape paintings that allow viewers today to visit the distant West Lake or the Eight Views of the Xiao and Xiang Rivers were created from the mountain climbing experiences of Ike Taiga (1723-76), who admired Japanese nature. This exhibition unveils the virtuous personality of Taiga who admired China’s literati culture since childhood and explores the secrets of sensory landscape paintings by looking at works depicting Mount Fuji and China’s scenic sites, and other landscape paintings of four seasons. We hope you will enjoy the heartwarming expressions of Taiga’s gentle and blissful paintings.

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    New Asia Week New York
    Place: Throughout metropolitan New York - New York, USA
    Date: Mar 14, 2024 to Mar 22, 2024
    Detail: Asia Week New York is an annual weeklong celebration of Asian art throughout metropolitan New York, with non-stop exhibitions, auctions and special events presented by leading international Asian art specialists, major auction houses, and world-renowned museums and cultural institutions.

    Asia Week New York is the premier destination for Asian art collectors, curators, scholars and enthusiasts.

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    New Lui Shou-Kwan
    Place: Alisan Fine Arts - New York, 120 East 65th Street, USA
    Date: Feb 29, 2024 to Apr 27, 2024
    Detail: ASIA WEEK OPENING RECEPTION
    March 14, 2024, 5-8pm

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    New Gods, Gardens and Princes: Indian Works on Paper
    Place: Oliver Forge and Brendan Lynch Ltd. - New York, 67 East 80 Street, Suite 2, USA
    Date: Mar 14, 2024 to Mar 22, 2024
    Detail: Opening Reception: Friday 15 March, 5-8pm

    For this 15th season of Asia Week New York, we are pleased to be present an exhibition comprising of court paintings from India and Persia from the 17th to 19th centuries. A highlight of the show is the striking painting, Krishna dancing on Kaliya flanked by two nagini. This, along with many other works on paper, will be displayed at our Upper East Side location.

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    New Spring Exhibition of Chinese Porcelain and Works of Art
    Place: Ralph M. Chait Galleries, Inc. - New York, 16 East 52nd Street, Suite 1002, USA
    Date: Mar 14, 2024 to Mar 22, 2024
    Detail: Join us for the 15th anniversary of Asia Week New York where we will showcase a fine collection of Chinese porcelain and works of art, including a rare Chinese Famille Verte porcelain titled Piggyback Boys, from the Kangxi Period (1662-1722). We will be open throughout the weekend from March 14th to the 22nd and look forward to your visit!

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    New Contemporary Japanese Art including those by “Living National Treasures”
    Place: Onishi Gallery - New York, 521 West 26th Street, USA
    Date: Mar 14, 2024 to Mar 22, 2024
    Detail: Opening Reception: Thursday, March 14th (5-8pm)

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    New Indian Painting
    Place: Francesca Galloway @ Les Enluminures Gallery - New York, 23 East 73rd Street, 7th floo, USA
    Date: Mar 14, 2024 to Mar 21, 2024
    Detail: Intimacy and Formality
    March 14 – 21, 2024
    Opening Reception: Thursday, March 14 until 8pm

    For Asia Week New York this March, we are pleased to present a small and exciting group of 17th and 18th century Mughal paintings, works from famous Bundi & Kota Ragamalas, a grand early 19th century Maratha processional scene by a Hyderabad trained artist, drawings for the famous Tehri Garhwal Gita Govinda series and Company School paintings including portraits of Indian children, a Skinner trooper and architectural studies of Mughal monuments and Hindu temples. Most of the paintings are recent acquisitions from private collections. Exhibition catalog forthcoming.

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    New Time is a Construct
    Place: Kapoor Galleries - New York, 34 East 67th Street, Floor 3, USA
    Date: Mar 14, 2024 to Mar 22, 2024
    Detail: Opening Reception: Thursday, March 14, 6-8 pm

    Art serves as a compass for our conscience, guiding us across the vast dimensions of time and space. More than a visual representation, art embodies the very essence of culture, punctuating the canvas of existence with strokes of meaning.

    This exhibition serves as a pivotal moment in contemporary times, prompting a reevaluation of the relationship between art, culture, and their collective influence across time and space. The examination of Indian miniature paintings is a focal point of this introspection; the deliberate repetition of characters and spatial elements over centuries emerge as a nuanced artistic strategy. This repetition is hardly monotonous. Instead, the repetition reveals a profound symbolic depth in the continuity of timeless themes.

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    New Dragon Women: Early Chinese Photography
    Place: Loewentheil Photography of China Collection - New York, 10 W. 18th Street, USA
    Date: Mar 14, 2024 to Mar 22, 2024
    Detail: Opening Reception: Thursday, March 14, 5-9pm

    We are pleased to present Dragon Women: Early Photographs of China during this year’s Asia Week New York, which offers a rare occasion to view some of the earliest photographs of Chinese women, most taken in the 1860s and 1870s. The exhibition explores women’s place in society in the final decades of imperial China, as well as the representation of Chinese women in photography, exposing female attitudes toward the camera in the late Qing dynasty. Also included are rare photographs by the first known Chinese female photographer, Mae Linda Talbot, and works by Hedda Morrison, and Isabella Bird, as well as masterworks by Chinese and international photographers such as Sze Yuan Ming Studio, Pun Lun Studio, A Chan Studio, Lai Fong, and John Thomson, whose Portrait of Three Women in Beijing, circa 1868, is on view.  We look forward to welcoming you to our New York location at 10 W. 18th Street, 7th Floor.

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    New Chinese and Vietnamese Ceramics from American and Japanese Collections
    Place: Zetterquist Galleries - New York, 3 East 66th Street, USA
    Date: Mar 14, 2024 to Mar 24, 2024
    Detail: Zetterquist Galleries is delighted to present an exhibition of Chinese and Vietnamese Ceramics, all sourced from American and Japanese collections.

    The Chinese pieces range in date from the Tang through Ming Dynasty, starting with a large Tang Dynasty whiteware jar, rare for its size and excellent condition. There is a selection of nine Song Dynasty pieces with fine examples of Ding, Yaozhou, Henan and Cizhou pieces from Northern China. From Southern China, there are elegant examples of Qingbai porcelains from the Hutien Kilns and a Jian-yao “Hare’s fur” tea bowl from a Japanese tea ceremony collection. From the Ming Dynasty there are two Longquan celadons; The barbed-rim charger with an ideal minty-green glaze color, and an exquisite “Gu” form vase, with Taoist trinary symbols, in an old lacquer box with silver inscription, also from a Japanese tea ceremony collection.

    Most of the Vietnamese selections come from the collection of Mary and Cheney Cowles, whose extraordinary collection of Chinese ceramics sold in these rooms last Spring. They collected Vietnamese ceramics with the same exacting eye for quality, condition and beauty with which they chose their Chinese wares. Representing Northern Vietnamese kilns from the Ly Dynasty (1009-1225) through the Le Dynasty (1428-1788), this scholarly collection includes wares of varied techniques, forms and functions. From the elegant Thanh Hoa pieces with Buddhist inspired form, to Blue and white porcelaineous pieces of excellent condition and intricate decoration, this group exhibits the finest of Vietnamese wares.

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    New A Discovery of Dragons
    Place: Kaikodo LLC - The Big Island, 27-760 Old Onomea Road, Hawaii, USA
    Date: Mar 14, 2024 to Apr 18, 2024
    Detail: Our upcoming Asia Week New York online exhibition will showcase a Chinese Cizhou-ware Ceramic Pillow with Double-phoenix Décor. This stoneware pillow is a breathtaking example of a technique for producing ceramic decoration perfected by Cizhou potters during the 11th century of the Song dynasty in northern China. The remarkable precision apparent in the production of the rare double-phoenix design on the headrest of the pillow and the density and intricate placement of the stamped rings forming the ground are exemplary, producing an effect that is as close to refined metalware decoration as a potter could get.

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    New Japanese Prints from 1750-1950
    Place: The Art of Japan (online) - Medina, Washington, USA
    Date: Mar 15, 2024 to Mar 17, 2024
    Detail: For this year’s Asia Week New York, we will be presenting Japanese Prints, 1750-1950, featuring the Courtesan of the Northern Quarter, one of five
    Women’s Contemporary Style.” This rare illustration is one in a series of large close-up prints showing the styles of different women. We look forward to displaying these Japanese prints in the traditional manner in folders in a comfortable and quiet setting at The Mark Hotel on the Upper East Side of Manhattan.

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    New Japanese Art | Pre-modern and beyond
    Place: BachmannEckenstein Japanese Art - New York, 1044 Madison Avenue, Suite #4F, USA
    Date: Mar 15, 2024 to Mar 19, 2024

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    New Fabled Lands: Persian & Indian Paintings
    Place: Art Passages - San Francisco, 3450 Sacramento St, California, USA
    Date: Mar 15, 2024 to Mar 22, 2024
    Detail: Art Passages will be having an exhibition of over 45 Indian and Persian paintings from the 15th to 19th century. These paintings are often illustrations to the various literary sources that emerged from India and Iran, the fabled lands, over the millennia.

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    New Japanese Paintings, Prints, and Illustrated Books, 1760-1810
    Place: Sebastian Izzard LLC - New York, 17 East 76th Street, 3rd Floor, USA
    Date: Mar 15, 2024 to Mar 22, 2024
    Detail: March 15 – 22, 2024
    Special Asia Week Hours: Open daily, 11am-5pm (closed Sunday)

    Our spring exhibition explores the graphic culture of Edo in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The introduction of color printing in the 1760s led to new techniques which were quickly adopted by the skilled craftsmen employed by the publishers of the period. The exhibition also chronicles changes in fashions and political affairs that affected the world of ukiyo-e, both in representations of the licensed entertainment quarter of the Yoshiwara and the city at large. Suzuki Harunobu (1724–1770) and his contemporaries are represented as are his successors in the following decades such as Torii Kiyonaga and Kitagawa Utamaro.

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    New Korean Artists in Paris
    Place: HK Art & Antiques LLC - New York, 49 East 78th Street, Suite 4B, USA
    Date: Mar 15, 2024 to Apr 05, 2024
    Detail: March 15 – April 5, 2024
    Special Asia Week Hours: Monday-Friday, 11am-6pm (otherwise by appointment)

    We are pleased to present Korean Artists in Paris for this year’s Asia Week New York. Curated by Heakyum Kim and Pierre Cambon, the former curator at the Musée Guimet, this exhibition showcases the work of Chung Sanghwa, Shin Sung Hy, Nam Kwan and Kim Sang-lan, four Korean artists who have lived and worked in Paris. Known in both Korea and France, their successful careers cover a great span of time, from the 1950s to the present. Each artist demonstrates how the two countries impacted their work.

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    New Supernatural: Cat Demons, Ogres and Shapeshifters
    Place: Egenolf Gallery - New York, 151 W 54th St (near 7th Ave), USA
    Date: Mar 16, 2024 to Mar 17, 2024
    Detail: Special Asia Week Hours: Saturday and Sunday, 11am-6pm & by appointment

    We are pleased to present Japanese prints of cat monsters, shapeshifting beauties, and other fantastic scenes of the supernatural during Asia Week New York. Spectral scenes were essential ingredients of kabuki plays, and ukiyo-e of the time reflect the excitement and drama of this mainstay of 19th c. popular culture. Kuniyoshi’s designs of demonic cat ghosts are especially remarkable, as he was a master of feline imagery. Yoshitoshi’s supernatural images are also renowned, especially for the power of their storytelling. Artists drew from the long tradition of supernatural stories in Japan, which dates back hundreds of years, even into the folklore of prehistory. We look forward to welcoming you to our upcoming exhibit at the Conrad New York Midtown from March 16th through the 17th.

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    New Asian Art including the Tsang Family Collection of Chinese Paintings
    Place: Bonhams - Woollahra, Sydney, 97-99 Queen Street, Australia
    Date: Apr 10, 2024

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